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Susan Stamberg in OKC

Susan Stamberg in OKC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 3, 2010
Contact: Traci Jinkens, Marketing and Development Director
Oklahoma Humanities Council
(405) 235-0280 • traci@okhumanitiescouncil.org

** Digital image of Susan Stamberg available by email **

NPR’s Susan Stamberg to Speak

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK — Susan Stamberg, journalist and correspondent for National Public Radio, will be the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Oklahoma Museums Association (OMA), 10:45 a.m., September 23 at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City. Stamberg will address the topic “Why History Museums Matter.” The lecture is funded in part by a grant from the Oklahoma Humanities Council and is free and open to the public.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program and has won every major award in broadcasting, including induction into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. As one of public radio’s most popular broadcasters, Stamberg is well-known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. She is the author of two books chronicling her time at NPR: Every Night at Five and TALK: NPR’s Susan Stamberg Considers All Things.

The joint meeting of AASLH and OMA Museums is an opportunity for libraries, archive professionals, historical societies, tribal cultural centers, and other related organizations to network and learn new techniques. Over 80 sessions and workshops will give insight on developing, delivering, and marketing history.

For information on the Susan Stamberg lecture or attending the conference, contact the Oklahoma Museums Association at (405) 424.7757 or visit: http://www.okmuseums.org/annual-conference.

About the Oklahoma Humanities Council

The Oklahoma Humanities Council is an independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide meaningful public engagement with the humanities—disciplines such as history, literature, film studies, art criticism, and philosophy. As the state partner for the National Endowment for the Humanities, OHC provides teacher institutes, Smithsonian exhibits, reading groups, and other cultural opportunities for Oklahomans of all ages. With a focus on K-12 education and community building, OHC engages people in their own communities, stimulating discussion and helping them explore the wider world of human experience.

Susan Stamberg’s lecture is funded in part by a grant from the Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions or recom-mendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or OHC, its Board of Trustees, or staff.