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Pulitzer Prize Centennial Programs

Browse the social media posts and comments about the Pulitzer Prize Centennial readings from our Let's Talk About It, Oklahoma program. Use the hashtag #Pulitzer100 on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to find information about other Pulitzer Centennial programs and to post your own comments. 

FINAL Things They Carried cover + quote

Can a fictional story convey more truths about war than actual facts? Tim O’Brien’s Vietnam War novel The Things They Carried is the first book in our “War, Not-War, & Peace” reading and discussion series. Readers discuss the book’s exploration of the realities of war and the difficulty of expressing war’s impact.

“I love this book . . . it was on my list of ‘scandalous books; nearly banned.’” --@inchsol (via Instagram)

“It was a really great discussion this evening.” –Amy Gantt (via Facebook)


Quanah FINAL

What qualities made Quanah Parker a great leader of the Comanche tribe? Is S.C. Gwynne’s portrayal of Parker and what he calls “the most powerful Indian tribe in American history” accurate? Empire of the Summer Moon is the second book in our “War, Not-War, & Peace” reading and discussion series.


The Way West FINAL FINAL

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Way West by A.B. Guthrie is a portrayal of emigrants on the Oregon Trail in the 1840s and their conflicting reasons for pushing out on the frontier. It is a selection in our “American Frontier” reading & discussion series.


Maus FINAL 2

How could “the most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust” (according to the Wall Street Journal) be a graphic novel where Nazis are portrayed as cats? The Pulitzer Prize winning book Maus by Art Spiegelman is a reading in our “War, Not-War, and Peace” reading and discussion series.

 

Behind the Beautiful Forevers FINAL 2

How could the 2008 U.S. mortgage crisis affect the lives of trash recyclers in the slums of Mumbai, India? How are struggles for civil rights and justice overseas connected to issues of privilege and inequality in our culture? Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Pulitzer Prize-winner Katherine Boo examines the hidden world of the Mumbai slums, which stand in sight of the city’s most luxurious districts. It is the final book in our “Civil Rights and Equality” reading and discussion series celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prizes.


All the Light FINAL FINAL

The effects of war on individuals far from the battlefields is one of the themes of the Pulitzer-winning 2014 novel All the Light We Cannot See. Anthony Doerr's World War II novel is a reading in our “War, Not-War, and Peace” discussion series celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prizes. 

Known World FINAL 5

Why would a freed slave in antebellum Virginia become a slaveowner himself? Edward P. Jones’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Known World tells a story of the poisoned moral judgments at the heart of slavery, and it is the first book in our “Civil Rights and Equality” reading and discussion series.


Native Guard FINAL

“In the South, a lot of times the history that is around us is a Confederate history. You might think the South actually won the war because of all the monuments.”
-Natasha Tretheway

The Pulitzer Prize-winning poetry collection Native Guard by Natasha Tretheway is the second reading in our “Civil Rights & Equality” reading & discussion series.


Arc of Justice FINAL

When a black doctor purchased a home in a white Detroit neighborhood in 1925, the resulting violence led to pivotal legal battles described in Kevin Boyle’s Pulitzer finalist book Arc of Justice. The New York Times review of the book suggests the resultant murder trial “became an artful piece of publicity, a forum through which to persuade white America that racial prejudice was something to be ashamed of.” Arc of Justice is a selection in our “Civil Rights and Equality” reading and discussion series.


Plauge of Doves FINAL

Have Native American struggles for civil rights been overshadowed by those of other minority communities? Can a novel address historical issues of property rights, interracial families, and social injustice? The Pulitzer Prize finalist The Plague of Doves by Louise Erdrich takes on these issues and is a reading in our “Civil Rights and Equality” reading and discussion series.


Yusef K FINAL 2

How can poetry express a combat veteran’s experiences of war? Pulitzer winner Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Facing It” describes his visit to the Vietnam Memorial a decade after he fought in the war. His poetry collection Neon Vernacular reflects on the impact of war and is a reading in our “War, Not-War, and Peace” discussion series.